About Natalie, As Author, Part 2: The Development of My Writing

I’d sure like for us to become better acquainted. It’s kind of awkward over the internet. However, I have a few Q&A items that might serve us to this end.

Today’s centers on my development as a writer.

I hope that you will comment below and introduce yourself, as well, and let me know what brought you here.

Thank you! In advance: it’s nice to meet you.

How has your writing developed over the years?

Since high school, people have told me that I’m a good (at times, excellent) writer; however, I never considered myself a writer—not until, that is, God tapped me to write a book to encourage women to develop themselves biblically and theologically (about ’01). I’ve worked hard to develop my writing voice as I’ve crafted what eventually became Women, Leadership, & the Bible: How Do I Know What to Believe?

I invested four years, tons of effort and study, and $10K into a D.Min. degree primarily to force myself to hone the idea in writing and, subsequently, complete the primary research. I attended two (maybe three) years of the Writer’s Publishing Workshop, offered at Gordon-Conwell, submitting my idea and writing to peers, editors, and publishers for feedback and learning. For six years, I attended the Society of Biblical Literature/American Academy of Religion’s annual meetings so I could make contacts for the book’s emergence and take advantage of every writing workshop either association offered.

Initially, I attended the Synergy Women’s Network conferences primarily for the same reasons; then I attended it for those reasons, plus I’d finally found a place that I felt I could “breathe” theologically and as a woman. I not only wanted to make contacts and improve myself there, but I wanted to participate as fully as I could and contribute significantly to other women’s well-being, as well as the network’s.

It’s taken me twelve years to write the book, so I’ve had a lot of time to develop my writer’s voice. I sought and received excellent—and often helpfully critical—feedback on my style, making the end product clearer and hopefully more enjoyable for a reader.

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